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20130318
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
between who has the authority to regulate elections. the election clause of the constitution actually gives authority to both. but where is the line when one crosses or goes too far than the other does? so that's the issue before the court. it wasn't clear today that it's going to be an easy line to find. >> ifill: the reason why this arizona law exists is because arizona officials say there's a problem involving illegal or undocumented immigrants registering to vote fraudulently. is there any evidence... did they present evidence today that that's a big problem? >> no, not today. in fact, there was more argument on the other side that there is no problem. but what arizona is saying is there is also a problem with the federal law. the federal law doesn't require proof that citizenship. but the way it deals with citizenship as eligibility for registration is it requires the applicant who wants to register to vote to sign under oath that the applicant meets all of the requirements of the federal law. arizona's attorney general thomas horn today told the court that that was an honor roll
in the election and is now in the government said we don't need-- a second palestinian state. that isn't new thinking. and he said very pointedly, people can't be occupiers in their own land. in order, he was rejecting the ideaçó that israelis don't have the right to live anywhere they want in the entire territory. today i talked to ashwari, a palestinian very prominent, still member of the p.l.o. executive committee and she said we don't need new language and thinking we need new will and courage by the united states and palestinians were widespread in their disappointment with the trip because they felt that the president had really embraced the israeli kind of view of this conflict, and had not expressed a willingness to press for some free zone settlement. it does not mean something may not happen. but you could see that new thinking is going to come hard in this region of a very old conflict. >> margaret warner, thank you very much, joining us from amman. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": chicago's plans to shutter public schools; the growing gap on how internet access is bei
's quite clear to everyone that this pope was elected on a reform mandate. that is the other 114 cardinals in the sistine chapel who elected cardinal jorge mario bergoglio as pope francis want someone who is going to shake up entrenched ways of doing business in the vatican and when they talk about reform they're not talking about secular model of reform meaning changes to church teaching on matters such as abortion or birth control. instead they're talking about changes in business management in the vatican towards making the bureaucracy here more transparent, that is both internally and externally, making it clearer who's making decisions and why and also doing a better job communicating with the outside world towards making it more accountable. that is the idea that there ought to be penalties for poor performance and towards making it efficient. the notion being is that there thinking in centuries may have cut it once upon a while but in a 21st century world it simply doesn't do it anymore. that's what these cardinals mean by reform and they have embraced pope francis tasman who can de
most if notal of those senators re-elected. already it is a difficult prospect, and it w be made more difficult, reid fears, if they were asked to vote on this. >> woodruff: when senator feinstein says reid has promised hear, in essence, he will let her introduce an amendment there, will be a vote on the amendment, what are the prospickets it's going to get any easier then? >> reporter: as reid said very specifically yesterday, quite astonish will, he said he doesn't think it has even 40 votes but it will fulfill a promise he made on behalf of the president to hold an up-or-down vote on this measure even if it doesn't have support. it has broad support in polling the "washington post" has done and pew has done and other groups but considering the breakdown of the senate where you need 60 votes in order to end debate on something and about that number-- well, you really need just about 50 for final passage but in order to get over the procedural hurdle in the senate you need 6015, maybe 20 are not comfortable voting for this and there certainly aren't enough republicans, either. >> woo
some of the themes that helped get him elected in 2008: that the people should compel their leaders to action. >> let me say this as a politician, i can promise you this: political leaders will not take risks if the people do not demand that they do. you must create the change that you want to see. >> warner: the evening closed with a state dinner; tomorrow, the president leaves for jordan. >> brown: a short time ago, i spoke to margaret in jerusalem. >> brown: margaret, start with the speech there in jerusalem. the president has been unpopular in israel. he specifically targeted young israelis in this major address. what did officials there tell you about the message he wanted to get across? >> warner: jeff, he wanted to do very much what he did in the 2008 campaign as a senator in which he directly appealed to younger and uninvolved citizens, people who have been apolitical in the past to get engaged and get involved and actually believe they can change their country. and really very resonant of the '80 8 campaign. he had one line at the end where he said "as we face the twilight
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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